Mario J. Molina

Mario J. Molina

As is his family’s tradition, Mario José Molina traveled the world while receiving his formative education. His early years were spent at home in Mexico City. He would then attend a German language boarding school in Switzerland for high school, after which he went on to receive degrees in chemical engineering and various chemistry-related subjects from universities in Mexico, Germany, and finally, the University of California at Berkeley in the US. Molina’s contributions to the field of science continued to gain recognition as his research proved to be of increasing importance. He is credited with being the principal correspondent in researching the effect of manmade materials, especially chlorofluorocarbons, which are used in refrigerants, aerosols, cleaning solvents, and producing plastics, on the ozone layer.

The theory was introduced in 1974 through the science journal, Nature. Molina’s partners in this research endeavor were F. Sherwood Rowland and Paul Crutzen. By the 1980s, there was already observable differences being discovered that validated their research. This caused a rise in the environmental impact of household products, and in 1995, the group received the Nobel Prize. Molina continues to be a leader in research and educating the world on reducing its carbon footprint. In 2013, he also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Citation & Further reading: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Mario-Molina